Verizon Begins Selling SureCall EZ-4GV

We noticed a few months back that SureCall had registered a new device, the EZ-4GV, with the FCC, and had been expecting a product announcement. Today though we discovered the true purpose of the new device: it's being sold directly through Verizon.

How does the SureCall EZ-4GV work?

The new SureCall EZ-4GV is very similar in design to SureCall's other budget product, the SureCall EZ-4G. An somewhat ornate antenna with a built-in amplifier is placed in the window, and then coax is run to a desktop antenna that retransmits the signal indoors.

The big difference between the EZ-4GV is the EZ-4G is that the EZ-4GV only supports a single band: Verizon's 700 MHz Band 13. There's no support for 850 MHz, 1900 MHz, or AWS bands.

How well does the SureCall EZ-4GV perform?

The EZ-4GV is a single band device, on Verizon's most congested band. If you have enough signal by a window to allow calls to be placed, the EZ-4GV will allow you to spread that signal indoors. However, since it's a single-band unit, we don't recommend it for boosting data rates. For best data performance, you really need carrier aggregation across multiple bands.

Will the SureCall EZ-4GV work for me?

In terms of power and gain, the EZ-4GV offers 15 dBm downlink power and 25 dBm uplink power on Band 13, and around 61 dB of gain. That means that for best performance, you'll need at least -80 dBm RSRP signal in the window where you install the unit.

If you don't have 4G LTE signal by a window for the EZ-4GV to amplify, then you're out of luck. The EZ-4GV doesn't support an outdoor antenna mounted setup.

How much does the SureCall EZ-4GV cost?

Verizon's product page is currently quite sparse, but at the moment it looks like the unit will retail for $150. That makes it one of the lowest-cost boosters on the market. And that makes sense: as a single band device it's significantly simpler than most other devices on the market. Of course, that also means that performance will be limited


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